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Wedding Vows for Various Religions

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Exchanging vows is a crucial part of the wedding ceremony. Never before have words held so much meaning in purpose in one’s life as they do the day they pledge their life to the one they love. Many couples opt to choose a more traditional set of vows represented by their religious or cultural makeup. However, it is becoming more popular for couples to personalize individual expressions from their heart to the one they are about to share their life with. This is the one moment in time, gathered amongst family and friends, that you’ll be able to share the depth of your love for your fiancé. This memory will last a lifetime.

Christian based ceremonies are quite similar though their religious teachings may vary. The symbolism is in the acceptance of one to the other in becoming husband and wife. It is also a pledge of faithfulness that is broken only by the unfortunate event of death.

The Apaches express a blessing which represents the respect and care each needs to provide in the union. It also holds an atmosphere which is essential within a successful marriage. It asks that you “remind yourselves often of what brought you together.” Remembering to focus on the positive in your life together is an important tool to utilize when faced with difficulties. One simply cannot argue, with this message.

Jewish vows are very direct. They are straightforward in their promise to love, cherish, and protect one another despite the misfortunes they may face throughout their lives. It ends with the significance of living a life together that is “hallowed by the faith of Israel.”

In Muslim the vows are a simple offering of oneself in accordance with the instructions of the Holy Quran and the Holy Prophet.

Quaker vows are quite formal. They include the date, city, and state of the bride and groom. They also may list the name of the meeting place of union and its residence. Finally, it formally verifies that the union is agreed upon by both the bride and groom.

Question of Intent is self explanatory. Yet, it also holds similarities to the Christian ceremony. The Common Prayer would suggest a note of popularity leading one to think it is most often used. In theme this could be true. However, its’ emphasis of God may be more prominent than written in others.

Of course every variation of vows is not listed within this article but a little research can go a long way in providing you with the perfect words for your special day.



See Also

The Wedding Vows
Christian Vows
Your Own Vows
Various Religions

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